Wire 766 | Indigo

Wire 766 | Indigo

Plaster, pigments on panel · 70 x 100 cm · 2011

Wire 714

Wire 714

Plaster, pigments on panel · 100 x 70 cm · 2011

Wire 103

Wire 103

Iron sheet, plaster on panel · 160 x 120 cm · 2003

Wire 75

Wire 75

Iron wire, plaster on panel · 100 x 70 cm · 2003

Wire 50

Wire 50

Iron wire, plaster on panel · 120 x 100 cm · 2002

Wire 48

Wire 48

Iron wire, plaster on panel · 100 x 70 cm · 2002

Wire 44

Wire 44

Iron wire, plaster on panel · 80 x 60 cm · 2001

Wire 42

Wire 42

Iron wire, plaster on panel · 80 x 60 cm · 2001

Wire 40

Wire 40

Iron wire, plaster on panel · 120 x 100 cm · 2001

Wire 39

Wire 39

Iron wire, mosaic on panel · 70 x 50 cm · 2001

Wire 14

Wire 14

Iron wire, plaster on panel · 80 x 60 cm · 2000

Wire 1

Wire 1

Iron wire, Plaster on panel · 50 x 35 cm · 2000

What I believe I should stress – in this world held together by the quasi-magic thread represented in Graziano Spinosi’s paintings and sculptures – is the trace of an unexhausted relationship with the memory of himself and his own heart. This is unexhausted because it cannot be otherwise: it is the origin, the umbilical cord, the bond of affection and kinship, but it is also ‘ thread, the chance of an escape route towards safety and the way back home. What we do not know is whether ‘home’ in this case is the roof under which we live and sleep, or the heavenly one to which we shall all return. This is because the thread then becomes a structural element that is part of a formal mystery, in the sense of the form that Spinosi gives to his sculptures, works, creatures and daughters. It is a mystery that makes you want to ask about the origins of these forms – that is, whether they derive from the work of enchanted animals or from the secret thoughts of the man who made them. It would hardly be pertinent to trace the thread of Spinosi’s creativity back to any of the abstract art movements because this would regard only the exterior aspect, not the substance, the true heart of the work, which is something quite different. What I am trying to say is that there is sentiment in his work that is at variance with merely superficial results: the materials used vibrate with energy that clearly rejects any formulation involving apparent immobility. The works entitled Wire are combed fabrics, not carded ones: order appears to penetrate formlessness, establishing its clear, precise rhythm in what is virtually an eighteenth-century musical score. Every now and again there may be just a suggestion of rust, although this touch of colour is but a question of detail, a simple vibrating string like an aeolian harp. If then the thread becomes a bar, the music is that of a piano, a little sonorous perhaps, but perfectly balanced. Spinosi has already had this thread inside him for years, as may be seen in one of his Libri (Books), either 1 or 2, of 1982. Although this was made of string, not of wire, it set up the same visual rhythm, with that sense of ‘combing’ to which I referred previously. It also created – just as the wire does today – that sense of attachment, a desire for exclusivity and precedence, an umbilical cord that will only be severed under constraint. This is poetry, therefore; but I do not know from where it springs forth and begins to flow. So, suddenly, there’s an unexpected movement and there it is in front of you, manifest in a brazen, yet inexplicable, manner. Arnaldo Romani Brizzi