TESSERAE

DRAWINGS | WORKS ON PAPER | VARIA

2018 | TESSERAE 35

2018 | TESSERAE 35

Hemp and beeswax on cardboard | 30 x 23

2018 | TESSERAE 34

2018 | TESSERAE 34

Raffia and beeswax on cardboard | 30 x 23

2018 | TESSERAE 33

2018 | TESSERAE 33

Raffia and beeswax on cardboard | 30 x 23

2018 | TESSERAE 32

2018 | TESSERAE 32

Raffia and beeswax on cardboard | 30 x 23

2018 | TESSERAE 31 | BROKEN HEART | RIGHT

2018 | TESSERAE 31 | BROKEN HEART | RIGHT

Acrylic and collage on cardboard | 30 x 23

2018 | TESSERAE 30 | BROKEN HEART | LEFT

2018 | TESSERAE 30 | BROKEN HEART | LEFT

Acrylic and collage on cradboard | 30 x 23

2018 | TESSERAE 29 | EMPTY

2018 | TESSERAE 29 | EMPTY

Drawing folder and pencil | 30 x 40

2018 | TESSERAE 28

2018 | TESSERAE 28

Aluminum on polystyrene XPS | 30 x 40

2018 | TESSERAE 27

2018 | TESSERAE 27

Oil painting on cardboard | 30 x 23

2018 | TESSERAE 26 | ●

2018 | TESSERAE 26 | ●

Oil painting on cardboard | 30 x 23

2018 | TESSERAE 25

2018 | TESSERAE 25

Oil painting on cardboard | 30 x 23

2018 | TESSERAE 24

2018 | TESSERAE 24

Aluminum on cardboard | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 23

2018 | TESSERAE 23

Aluminum on cardboard | 24 18

2018 | TESSERAE 22

2018 | TESSERAE 22

Sand paper on cardboard | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 21

2018 | TESSERAE 21

Sand paper on cardboard | 24 x18

2018 | TESSERAE 20

2018 | TESSERAE 20

Paper on cardboard | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 19

2018 | TESSERAE 19

Paper on cardboard | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 18

2018 | TESSERAE 18

Acrylic on cardboard | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 17

2018 | TESSERAE 17

Acrylic and collage  on cardboard | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 16

2018 | TESSERAE 16

Beeswax on cardboard | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 15

2018 | TESSERAE 15

Beeswax on cardboard | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 14

2018 | TESSERAE 14

Trace of gold leaf on cardboard | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 13

2018 | TESSERAE 13

Trace of gold leaf on cardboard | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 12

2018 | TESSERAE 12

Velvet paper on cardboart | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 11

2018 | TESSERAE 11

Velvet paper on cardboart | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE 10 | ●

2018 | TESSERAE 10 | ●

Velvet paper on cardboart | 24 x 18

2018 | TESSERAE | TOLEMAIDE

2018 | TESSERAE | TOLEMAIDE

Cardboard and copper | 30 x 40

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

Pencil on paper | 32 x 24

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

Pencil on paper | 32 x 24

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

Pencil on paper | 32 x 24

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

Pencil on paper | 32 x 24

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

Pencil on paper | 32 x 24

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

Ink on paper | 32 x 24

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

Ink on paper | 32 X 24

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

Ink on paper | 32 x 24

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

2012 | STUDY FOR NEST

Tempera on paper | 32 x 24

1998 | ROMAN OPALKA SHOES

1998 | ROMAN OPALKA SHOES

Ink on paper | 25 x 25

1999 | AMADEUS MOZART SHOES | ●

1999 | AMADEUS MOZART SHOES | ●

Pencil and tempera on paper | 25 x 25

1997 | CALDER SHOES

1997 | CALDER SHOES

Ink on paper | 25 x 25

1997 | MARTHA GRAHAM SHOES

1997 | MARTHA GRAHAM SHOES

Ink and tempera on paper | 25 x 25

1998 | GEORGE GERSWHIN SHOES

1998 | GEORGE GERSWHIN SHOES

Pastel and tempera on paper | 25 x 25

1997 | YVES KLEIN SHOES

1997 | YVES KLEIN SHOES

Tempera on paper | 25 x 25

1994 | LUCIO FONTANA SHOES

1994 | LUCIO FONTANA SHOES

Pencil on paper | 25 x 25

1998 | MARK ROTCHKO SHOES | ●

1998 | MARK ROTCHKO SHOES | ●

Pencil and tempera on paper | 25 x 25

True Plumb

Notes on Graziano Spinosi’s work.

(…) but a few dared into the Sanctuary. Hölderlin

Lev Tolstoy once wrote that the ideological content of a work of art lies in its structure.  It’s a concise and crystal clear observation, a final verdict which remarks the intrinsic eloquence that belongs to the structural values ​​of artistic creation. Here, I am inclined to think that all of this is very closely related to Graziano Spinosi’s work, both for the clear cohesion of form and content that has always distinguished it, and for the accuracy, to the limit of peremptoriness; thus themes and ideological connections emerge only by passing through the structural meshes and their compositional organization. The structure represents the true focal point of his exercise, not so much as a scheme or a mere procedural grid, but as a representation of a precise way of thinking and feeling: as the exact secretion of his experience – his psychic furrow, his slime trail or wake. It is a distillation which is carried out by means of a basic element, as Romani Brizzi points out in his essay on Spinosi’s work. A simple object that proves to be at the same time instrument, matrix and resultant of expressive synthesis. This element is the thread. And in order to understand, in this context, its triple soul (material, symbolic and practical) we need to dwell briefly on its forthright givenness. Whether it’s a rope, an iron rod, a thin raffia or rattan stick, its character is to unfold in cycles and returns, forging structures only by delivering the gesture to a higher monotony, to a psalmodic cadence – leading it to a nearly inexhaustible repetition compulsion. The same is true if we pay attention to the verbal spectrum pertaining thereto, here we can only find actions that involve a time span: spinning, intertwining, weaving, knotting… The system in which it articulates is made of commissures, punctuations and measured pausations. Caesuras are strange to it. Such properties can only foster a kind of figurative tunnel; each performing thrust sinks, contracts, in the pursuit of invisible occlusion coordinates, even when the impression one receives is of vertical extensivity. I would say that every Graziano Spinosi’s work, whether pictorial or plastic, strives irreversibly for this implosion of its expansive virtuality, circumscribing itself in high density areas, in a bundle of beams, of solidified and impregnable forms – in the reiterated construction of a hermetic and safe temple. It is only through this limiting, enclosing, rebinding – only by returning to the same point, that the filamentous structure allows experience to transcribe itself into language. And from here it moves, the extraordinary exuberance of analogies, metaphors and resemblances that Graziano Spinosi’s works are able to evoke. Here are the “Nidi, nests, or otherwise beehives, cocoons, drones, chrysalises: ovoid, encircled sculptures in which, without a doubt, the introspective dimension of a solitary genesis prevails, but it is also static and frozen, as if the metamorphic processality suggested by these envelopes had undergone a sudden and resolving crystallization. Thus, the “Foresta” installation, a Cartesian circle of cone-shaped trees, has an intense architectural austerity – a wooded sequence that, instead of branching out, plumbs to an archetypical ancestral impenetrability. Or the “Wire” series, where wax castings and concrete are cut by a horizon line, placed there to isolate an impossible perspective vanishing line. Everything seems to invite for a mise en abîme of reality, or rather, for its empathized version: for that typical saturation that occurs when the external space inscribes itself in the field of intimacy and here it receives its ultimate configuration. The outcome is a kind of fossil perception of the world, where experience indexes itself in objects wedged into the surrounding scene, escaping from any contamination with it, claiming only its existence (and another sign of this fossil sensibility is offered to us by the privileged materials of the artist, whose texture uniquely refers to a primordial matteric code). These mute steles, these visual arcana, as a mirage of possible salvation, ideally counterpoint the deconstructed space of the world, its senselessness and its unbridled chaotic nature . Few can build or venture into such sanctuaries. Few can acknowledge that  the will to act on the outer edge, on the “outside”, can only be implemented by practicing the internal limit of what is representable. Explicit Blanchot: “only what is best closed is opened; only what belongs to the greatest opacity is transparent.” Roberta Bertozzi